Tag Archives: Writing

Teaching and Advocacy

Teaching and Advocacy

co-edited with Debbie Coughlin and Joanna Marasco, Stenhouse, February, 1997.

This book is particularly moving since the issues are seen through the eyes of practicing teachers who are struggling with student advocacy issues as they write their diaries, analyze their students’ writing, and try to figure out how far they can go in their own teaching situations. Any teacher who wants to connect literacy to action and writing to the passion with which it is generated, and who agonizes over how political she or he should be and still survive to tell the tale, should be moved by this book.

Available at:

Amazon | B&N

Growing Up Literate, Learning From Inner City Families

Growing Up Literate, Learning From Inner City Families

Heinemann, May, 1988. Ninth Printing.

Awarded the Ninth Annual Mina P. Shaughnessy Prize by the Modern Language Association of America, 1989.

Denny Taylor and Catherine Dorsey Gaines made the first of what were to be many visits to families living in the inner city of a major metropolitan area in the Northeast. Their aim: to study the familial contexts in which young Black children living in urban poverty are growing up literate. Through their focus on children who were successfully learning to read and write despite extraordinary economic hardship, this multiracial team presents new images of the strengths of the family as educator and the ways in which the personal biographies and educative styles of families shape the literate experiences of children. Through the stories of the Shay Avenue families, Taylor and Dorsey-Gaines reach several conclusions that some readers may find surprising.

Available at:

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Family Literacy: Young Children Learning to Read and Write

Family Literacy: Young Children Learning to Read and Write
Heinemann, Second Edition, October 1998. Second printing.

“…Family Literacy documents the diverse ways in which six families use literacy daily in their lives. Through Taylor’s accessible writing, we get to know families who participate in “idiosyncratic processes” that result in children who are successful in learning to read. Even as they take literacy learning within their families for granted, their literacy histories inform the development of school curricula that build on the literacy knowledge of the children and their families…”

Yetta M. Goodman

From the forward: Family Literacy

Available at: Amazon | B&N